Kickin’ It With Community Queen Kelly Stocker

This interview was part of an unconventional Substack portfolio I shared with the editorial team at Slack! Kelly Stocker is woman-about-town. Many Austinites know her as the former Community Manager who helped write the playbook for creating purposeful communities at Yelp. Others know her from her popular Friday Five newsletter, her Thrillist bylines, and her booming voice as …

How the Blood Center of Central Texas Became We Are Blood (Austin Monthly; January 2017)

REBRANDING EXPERTS THE BUTLER BROS. EXPLAIN HOW THEY KEEP IDEAS FLOWING Drivers on North Lamar Boulevard or Slaughter Lane may have recently noticed something new, and a little odd, while passing the Blood Center of Central Texas. The sign there, which previously featured the (not-at-all remarkable, merely serviceable, purely perfunctory) former name of the organization, …

Uncommon Threads: Fort Lonesome’s custom designs are as cool as it gets (Austin Monthly; March 2016)

Original Austin Monthly article here. The Fort Lonesome studio in the Zilker neighborhood whirs with activity. As Paula Cole’s “Where Have All the Cowboys Gone?” plays on the stereo, four industrial vintage Singer sewing machines purr. One woman sews a silver jacket at a frenetic pace while her colleagues stitch patches and a tapestry. In the center …

Eye On the Prize: By making styling trophies, Eva Schone comes in first (Austin Monthly; August, 2015)

Original Austin Monthly article here. Eva Schone is a sentimentalist. The living room of the 40-year-old designer’s Brentwood duplex is filled with the type of plants her family owned while she was growing up in East Germany. That same feeling of love and acknowledgment is evident in the products of her company, Trophyology, a boutique design …

Michael Sieben: It Will All Happen Again (Glasstire; February 6, 2014)

Original Glasstire story here. Michael Sieben has spent most of his adult life recalling what it’s like to be twelve-year-old child. As managing editor of skateboard publication, Thrasher Magazine, he tries to look at his surroundings with a youthful excitement, leaving his jaded thoughts at the door. That nostalgia for adolescence is on display in It Will …

An app to track Parkinson’s disease (Time Out Chicago; September 27, 2011)

Original Time Out story here.   “The big dream,” says Konrad Kording, “is to detect Parkinson’s before it even happens.” The 38-year-old sips herbal tea as he talks, his German accent barely noticeable after seven years in America. The skateboard he rode to work is propped outside of his 14th-floor office at the Rehabilitation Institute of …

Latina teens in Little Village push strollers (Medill Reports Chicago; December 7, 2010)

It’s not uncommon to walk through Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood and see dozens of Latina teens pushing strollers. “Fifty-two percent of Latina teens get pregnant at least once before age 20 – nearly twice the national average,” according to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. Chicago is playing a significant role in …

Garlic and Greens captures the history of soul food (Time Out Chicago; July 20, 2011)

Original Time Out Chicago story here. Fereshteh Toosi wants people to talk about soul food. The 35-year-old artist is collecting stories about the cuisine that African-Americans brought from the South during the Great Migration, when they planted okra, garlic, greens, red beans and yams in their Chicago gardens. She’s starting GARLIC & GREENS, a soul-food oral history …

Wheels of Commerce (Hartford Courant; July 11, 2005)

Original Hartford Courant article here. In an age of faxes, cellphones and e-mail -- when messages traverse the globe in an instant -- bicycle couriers should be an endangered species. Not in Hartford. Five male bicycle couriers zip through the city streets from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday to deliver important documents …

Art toys are getting a plush reception (The Dallas Morning News; September 14, 2004)

Clarisa Ramirez The Dallas Morning News Sept. 21, 2004 12:00 AM DALLAS - Toys have always been popular with children and collectors, but now there's a new breed booming: handmade art toys. These subversive, provocative toys are no teddy bears, and they're targeted at adults. Companies such as Ugly Dolls, biggerKrissy and FUSE Industrial Design's …